The Beyer Watch

The design of this watch emulates the giant timepiece that hangs outside the Beyer shop. It has served as a trademark for decades, and can be seen from a long way off on the Bahnhofstrasse.

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Patek Philippe MI master clock and the Inducta signal for school break signals, Zurich, around 1980

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Pneuora main clock from Junghans of 1931 with its daugther clock.

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J.G. Baer Sumiswald main clock around 1910, school building Luchs-Wiesen

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Moser Bear H61 with small signal clock around 1965

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FAVAG electromechanical signal clock with relay switch, ca 1950, place unknown

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Zenith-FAVAG clock system with translational relay, ca. 1959, place unknown

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G.A. Augustin pendulum clock with Hipp system, ca. 880, England

Electronics Museum

2006 marks the opening of the new electronic clocks section at the Beyer Clock and Watch Museum. Beyer has a close association with electronic timepieces, for the store included such a department from 1964 to 1988. To this day, dozens of Beyer clocks are still to be found in public areas; the best known are the Meeting Point clock at the main railway station and the Flower Clock at Bürkliplatz.

The first electric clocks, which date back to around 1890, were really mechanical timepieces equipped with an electric impulse unit. With the rapid adoption of electricity in households and public places, the requirements became increasingly complex. The exhibits on show are a representative but not exhaustive cross-section of electronic and electric clocks, illustrating the rapid development of and change in technology during the last century. The museum’s electronic clocks section is located at Bernerstrasse Nord 206 in Zürich, and is open by prior arrangement.