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Pocket watch „Skarabäus“ IWC, 1981, IWC Schaffhausen

Mechanical movement with calibre 982 F (F for Fuchs), comprising 161 components. The movement is based on an original shape that has been manufactured by IWC since 1930 and over the years has constantly been adapted to the latest developments in the art of watchmaking. Nivarox 1-grade Breguet spring, 19 ruby jewels, swan neck micrometre and balance wheel ring made from Glucydur, an alloy of copper, beryllium and iron, which is non-magnetic and non-oxidising. Case number 2300435, movement number 2358549, serial number 35/2500. Gold-plated semi-relief hand engraving on the bridge and plate. This hand engraving, which took three days to complete, makes each object a unique piece. IWC original certificate.

The watch is accompanied by a wooden box, fashioned from an over 400-year-old rootstock of a walnut tree that originated in a parish garden in the Eifel region of Germany. The “Skarabaeus” savonette was developed in a complex collaboration with the Austrian artist, Ernst Fuchs, the Venturi arte bronze foundry in Bologna, Huguenin Médailleurs from Le Locle and IWC Schaffhausen, and produced in a limited edition. The front of the pocket watch is adorned with a Scarabaeus, or dung beetle. This is considered by the Egyptians to be a symbol of eternal reincarnation; in addition, the ball of dung that it is forming around its egg signifies the sun. With its iridescent spectral colours, it also symbolises the essence of the day. On opening the spring cover, the dial appears as a shining solar disc, also embodying the day. In contrast, the back of the watch represents the night, with a reflecting moon in the centre surrounded by shining stars.

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Men’s wristwatch “Square” 1958, Geneva, Patek Philippe

Square case with polished gold bezel. Silver-coloured dial with small seconds sub-dial at 6 o’clock. Case number 516619, reference number 2444. Mechanical movement with serial number 749314. This watch made its way from Geneva to Port-au-Prince and back again to Switzerland. Kurt Nef lived with his family in Port-au-Prince in Haiti, where he was the manager of the department store, La Belle Créole. Due to the political turmoil under the rule of the Duvalier clan, in 1959 he decided to return with his wife and three children to the safety of Switzerland. The company presented him with this Patek Philippe wristwatch as a farewell gift. Late in his life, Kurt Nef gave his Patek Philippe to his son Eric. After his father’s death, Eric Nef decided to donate the “Square”, with its eventful past, to the Beyer Clock and Watch Museum.

 

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Chronograph “Nonius” ca. 1975, St. Imier, Longines

Extremely well preserved men’s steel wristwatch with a steel bracelet. The Longines chronograph features a nonius hand, which makes it possible to measure tenths of a second, in the same way as a calliper can measure tenths of a millimetre. The watch has a mechanical manual winding calibre with Cal. 332/Val 726 and case number 15973297. The silver coloured dial is equipped with a luminous, orange chronograph hand with a nonius display and three totalisers (sub-dials), which indicate the stopwatch time for the seconds, minutes and hours. The sub-dial for the 30-minute counter, as well as the seconds dial that frames the main dial, are flush mounted and offset in black. The large cushion-shaped stainless steel case is typical of the day.

 

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Enamel pocket watch ca. 1830, France

Silver pocket watch with a hinged glass front cover mounted in a polished bezel. The dial features a sub-dial at 6 o’clock, as well as a small date display at 12 o’clock. The latter only shows uneven numbers, with the even numbers indicated by small gold dots. In addition, at 2 o’clock is a display for the weekdays. The movement has a verge escapement with a fusee and chain. The dial is in very good condition and has hardly any wear marks. It is decorated with a beautifully preserved enamel painting, featuring a portrait of a young couple with a river landscape in the background.

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Pocket watch ca. 1750, Rotterdam, Steven Hoogendyk

Pocket watch with a silver case and additional outer case with decorations engraved on the case lid ring and around the edge of the case bottom. Hinged, separate crystal to protect the white enamel dial, which features black Roman numerals for the hours and Arabic numerals for the minutes. Ribbed, gold coloured bezel. Copper-coloured hour and minute hands. Richly adorned movement with verge escapement, fusee and chain. The bridge and plate are adorned with ornately chased decorations, such as the portrayal of a cherub between trees, skeletonised plant-like ornaments and the words “Steven Hoogendyk Rotterdam”. Steven Hoogendyk (1698-1788) was a Dutch watchmaker and physicist, and the son of the watchmaker couple, Adriaen Hoogendyk and Elisabeth Tracy.

 

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Lépine pocket watch “Calcutta” ca. 1930, London/Calcutta/Switzerland, Hamilton & Co.

Pocket watch in yellow and white gold, manual winding movement number 13865093, calibre 701. Silver-coloured, matt dial engraved with the words “Swiss Made”, blue Arabic numerals for the hours and small sub-dial at 6 o’clock with a circular engraving for the seconds, also blued Breguet hands for the hours and minutes. Case, bezel and case back all sport a very well preserved art deco striped design, with yellow gold, white gold and black enamel alternating with each other. Also belonging to the watch is an elegant watch chain with elongated links in black enamel joined together with small, golden rings. Robert Hamilton, born in England in 1772, trained as a silversmith. In 1808, he moved to India, where he opened his first silversmith’s shop at Tank Square 5 in Calcutta (now Kolkata), under the licence of the East Indian Company. Further shops were opened and besides selling its well-known silverware, the company also stocked exclusive luxury goods and watches. Although Hamilton & Co. continued to trade after India’s independence from the United Kingdom, it closed in 1973 due to the political unrest in the country.

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Pocket chronograph ca. 1910, Switzerland, Lemania

Large chronograph with a diameter of 64.5mm and a case made from nickel. White enamel dial with large, black Arabic numerals, blued hands for the hours and minutes, and a stopwatch hand and sub-dials for the seconds at 6 o’clock and 30 minutes at 12 o’clock. The company, Lemania, was founded in L’Orient Vallée de Joux in 1884 by Alfred Lugrin under the name of Lugrin S.A. Lugrin acquired his specialist knowledge as a labourer at Jaeger-LeCoultre in Le Sentier. He specialised in the production of chronographs, stopwatches and repeaters. In 1895, the company moved into its own factory building in L’Orient. The name of Lugrin S.A. was retained until 1930, until Lugrin’s son-in-law, Marius Meylan, set up Lemania Watch Co., domiciled in L’Orient. Incidentally, Beyer Chronometrie has family connections with the age-old Meylan watch dynasty from Western Switzerland: René Beyer’s great-grandfather, Adelrich Beyer (1858-1915), married Marie Valentine Meylan in 1883.

 

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Mido Robot small 1940s, Le Locle, Switzerland

These two rather curious-looking wooden robot figures date from the 1940s and 1950s, when they were used to advertise the then highly modern and technically innovative Mido watches, “Multifort” and “Powerwind”. Both robots are jointed wooden figures and are painted silver. Integrated into the body of the large, 60cm tall robot is a mechanical manual winding watch with a black dial with luminous numerals and hands. The dial is protected by a domed crystal with an aluminium bezel. Serial number 22785 and case number 8023, Swiss lever escapement without shock absorption. In contrast, the small robot, standing 22.5cm tall, is only fitted with a mock-up watch. A picture of a watch from the 1940s has been stuck onto a depression carved into the body. Both these robots were discovered years ago at the specialist watch shop, “Midas”, on the Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo, Buenos Aires. Mido Robots were used for promotional purposes from the 1930s onwards. They were displayed in the shop windows of watch stores in the USA and South America and symbolised progress and robustness. The Mido Robots were donated to the Beyer Clock and Watch Museum by Sebastien C. Schröder.

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Mido Robot large 1950s, Le Locle, Switzerland

These two rather curious-looking wooden robot figures date from the 1940s and 1950s, when they were used to advertise the then highly modern and technically innovative Mido watches, “Multifort” and “Powerwind”. Both robots are jointed wooden figures and are painted silver. Integrated into the body of the large, 60cm tall robot is a mechanical manual winding watch with a black dial with luminous numerals and hands. The dial is protected by a domed crystal with an aluminium bezel. Serial number 22785 and case number 8023, Swiss lever escapement without shock absorption. In contrast, the small robot, standing 22.5cm tall, is only fitted with a mock-up watch. A picture of a watch from the 1940s has been stuck onto a depression carved into the body. Both these robots were discovered years ago at the specialist watch shop, “Midas”, on the Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo, Buenos Aires. Mido Robots were used for promotional purposes from the 1930s onwards. They were displayed in the shop windows of watch stores in the USA and South America and symbolised progress and robustness. The Mido Robots were donated to the Beyer Clock and Watch Museum by Sebastien C. Schröder.

2017新购产品

值得一提的是参加此次展览的两件藏品。一件为来自俄罗斯Bronnikov兄弟1780年制作的木质怀表,此款配有木质珠链及独立的怀表表壳。圆形上弦钥匙也是木质。此怀表被列为杰出的大师级作品。另一作品是来自提契诺地区的台钟,约1680年。此款极为罕见的台钟钟体由核桃木和黑梨木组成,在私人收藏40年后第一次公开展出。

贝耶钟表博物馆座落于位于班霍夫大街31号的贝耶钟表店地下一层,属于世界上闻名的私人钟表博物馆之一。向您讲述从公元前1400至今时间的故事。诚挚的邀请您参观我们的最新藏品。